Is it Better to Board Cats With Medical Conditions With Your Vet?

If your cat has a long-term medical condition or is getting on in years and isn’t as healthy as it used to be, you may be worried about putting it in cat boarding. While you may have no concerns about a boarding facility’s ability to generally look after your pet, you may be worried about how the cattery will cope with your cat’s medications or what would happen if your cat gets sick and needs medical treatment. If your vet’s surgery offers cat boarding, this may give you some extra peace of mind. What are the advantages and disadvantages of boarding your cat with your vet?

The Advantages of Vet Boarding

Some vets will board cats in an animal hospital environment; others have a cattery attached to the practice. If your cat needs regular medical attention and you would prefer it to be monitored and treated by your own vet, this may be a good option for you. While a general cattery will have access to a vet, it may insist on using its own vet rather than the animal doctor you regularly use who knows all about your cat’s medical history.

Plus, if you board your cat with your vet, it will be on the site of the practice and can get help quickly if needed. If your cat falls ill in a cattery, it may need to wait for a vet to be called out or may have to be taken to a practice. In a vet’s surgery environment, your pet may also be cared for by the practice’s nurses who may have more experience of administering medications and identifying medical problems quickly. This may give your pet more immediate access to experienced medical care if it needs it.

The Disadvantages of Vet Boarding

Not all vet practices operate separate catteries. Some will board your cat but will put it in a hospital type of environment. These environments may be more geared towards to looking after very sick cats or those recovering from an operation or treatment. Your cat may not get as much individual space or attention as it would in a cattery and it may get bored if it ends up sitting in a small space with no option to get exercise during its stay.

Bear in mind that boarding your cat with your vet doesn’t always mean that your cat can automatically see a vet immediately if it has problems. Before choosing between a vet or a cattery, you also need to check how often the vet is available to deal with any emergency issues. While a practice may staff a boarding or hospital facility 24/7, this doesn’t necessarily mean that a vet is on site all day, every day, and there may be times when your pet may need to wait for treatment until your vet can get to it.  

For more information, contact companies like Welcome Boarding Kennels & Cattery.